The Janine Bolon Show with John David Latta - 99 Authors Project, Season 4, Episode 3

The 99 Authors Project – Season 4 – Episode 3 with John David Latta

John David Latta

John David Latta is a mystic, author, teacher and successful founder and CEO of a multimillion-dollar consumer products company. In his first book, The Synchronicity of Love, he shares his extraordinary stories of the radical transformation he underwent when he began to follow the path of Unconditional Love with sincerity and earnestness. His stories inspire, uplift, heal, shock, awaken and transform. 

John also teaches intimate workshops on leadership, healing, transformation, love, synchronicity, wisdom and awakening that unite and expand human experience. He lives with his wife Wendy in Redmond, Washington.

Transcript of the Show

Bryan Hyde
Welcome to the Janine Bolon show, where we share tips from around the globe. As we guide practical people with their finances using money tips, increase their incomes through side businesses, and maintain their sanity by staying in their creative zone.

Janine Bolon
Hello, Janine Bolon here, and welcome to today’s show that is loaded with quality content on mysticism, transformation and business savvy. The Janine Bolon show is the syndicated program of four podcast shows that were combined in October of 2021. Up to that point, my team and I, we were running four separate podcasts and we call them the Three Minute Money Tips, the Thriving Solopreneur, the Writers Hour Creative Conversations, and the Practical Mystic Show. But today, we are highlighting an incredible mystic that encapsulates all of these shows into one person. I am interviewing one of the 99 authors this year to receive their guidance and perspective on how you can get your message, your story, or your memoir out into the world. Now our upcoming guest is not only a mystic, but he’s also an author, teacher, and successful founder and CEO of a multimillion dollar consumer products company. In his debut book, The Synchronicity of Love, he shares his extraordinary stories of the radical transformation he underwent when he began to follow the path of unconditional love. Now, I know that sounds hokey, but this guy did it with sincerity and earnestness, and not only do his stories, inspire, uplift and heal people, they will also shock awaken and transform you while you’re reading them. So, welcome to the show, John David Latta. Great to have you.

John David Latta
Thank you so much, Janine. Appreciate the introduction.

Janine Bolon
You betcha. One of the things you may not know about John is he also teaches some pretty intimate workshops on leadership, healing, transformation, love, synchronicity, wisdom and awakening. Basically, he just wants you to unite and expand your human experience. So, with all that being said, talk to us a little bit about you know, like me, you’re a mystic, but we also started off in a very analytical mindset. So, I was an analytical biochemist, I’m a scientist, I made drugs for a living for crying out. I always like to say legal ones, legal ones. But for you, you were this incredible businessman. And what was the trigger that started this huge transformation for you?

John David Latta
Thanks, Janine. Like a lot of people pain, suffering, loss. I don’t know why that seems to be the trigger for most people, but it was for me. Everything that could have gone wrong in my life all went wrong at the same time. I think I’ve lived a relatively charmed life up to that point. And it took me from that very rational, logical, I think the only philosopher or spiritual, when you call it a spiritual teacher that ever looked up to as Ayn Rand, and everything began to shift after that, everything.

Janine Bolon
And who did you find comfort in, then at that point? So, some people will run to organized religion, but for mystics, we don’t. We have to walk outside of our normal traditions. Mystics are people who seek answers from within. So, how did you go about doing that?

John David Latta
Well, the door opener for me was ironically, the author Michael Creighton. And Michael Creighton wrote an autobiography called, Travels, and he shared a lot of inner and outer explorations. And I identify highly with Michael Creighton, I read all of his books, I loved his books, he has just a fantastic intellect. But even he went through a transformative phase in his life and began to explore the world that he called direct experience, he realized most of what he thought to be true he got from books, he got from other people. And so he decided a lot of things that he highly resisted, such as spirituality, such as the mystics path, he was going to explore it for himself. And it turned out he was incredibly mystical, and so that was a door opener, that Michael gave me the permission to explore that side of myself in a way that I would have resisted in the past.

Janine Bolon
That’s true, it doesn’t matter where the truth comes from. A lot of people have told me of transformations they had while reading Karl Marx and stuff like that. And it’s like, it doesn’t matter where the truth is packaged, doesn’t matter what the labeling is on it, something’s gonna trigger you. And so, thank you for telling me that because, as an Analytical Biochemist, Michael Creighton was kind of our hero, because he took biochemistry that nobody knew what to think of it. I mean, we were operating at the DNA level, the cellular level, and people were like, what are you doing? This was 20 years ago. And now of course, it’s the rage, but it was one of those fun things and so, thank you for bringing into the forefront one of my own personal heroes as well. So, with this transformation that you had, and as you started the mystics journey, and I would like for you to define what mystic means for you because I I have my definition, my listeners are used to my definition. But what’s your definition of a mystic?

John David Latta
My definition of a mystic is I get information, primarily through dreams. Sometimes through visions, sometimes during meditation that feels like it’s of a informative or teaching nature. There’s something that’s coming through that seems important. And it’s not something I was consciously seeking. And so I think some people’s experience of it might be you know, that their guides were speaking to them, or angels were speaking to them. I just know I get information and I love it when it comes through. It’s beautiful, it adds a whole dimension to life that I didn’t know existed, and it enthralls me to this day.

Janine Bolon
And so for those who may not know, I will be happy to tell you what my definition of mystic is, and that is a person who practices a form of spirituality that disciplines the mind so that you can achieve oneness with the absolute or God through an altered state of consciousness called bliss or ecstasy. And that’s only because I was raised in Japan, and I was also exposed to a lot of Hinduism in my life. But for somebody like John, coming through, his definition of mystic in no way is in conflict with mine. And that’s the neat thing about the difference between religion and mysticism, is that mysticism, mystics can get along very well together, because we know each experience is specifically tailored to us. Right?

John David Latta
That’s exactly right.

Janine Bolon
Tailored to each individual person, right? And so there’s no conflict, because why would I argue with symbols that are coming through in your vision, because those visions are for you? They’re not necessarily for me, right? Isn’t that delightful? It just levels the playing field, the way the internet did for so many people, and mysticism is that answer for me as well. So, one of the things that is entertaining is that as an author, you are sitting there trying to share with people this amazing experience, and in your case, multiple stories upon stories of your direct experiences. What made you choose to use your name rather than a pen name? Because some mystics hide behind a pen name?

John David Latta
That’s a great question. And I think at other times in my life, I would have gladly hidden behind that pen name.

Janine Bolon
Right?

John David Latta
Apart of the whole journey has been not only having the mystic dimension open to me, but being fearless, yet intelligent about sharing it with other people. And I suspect there are many people with past life memories of being mystics, and that it was not… There was life threatening to share some of your mystic encounters and mystic experiences. I think those days are coming to an end. So, it felt honest to me to use my name. And a big part of the journey has been trying to stomach vulnerability.

Janine Bolon
And no offense, especially as a guy, an American male vulnerability? Are you kidding? Show weakness? Oh, my gosh, they’ll tear me to pieces. Yeah.

John David Latta
That’s so funny. And I talk to my wife about this all the time, but the strength is in the vulnerability. And so I totally honor times are different. Times, one hundred, two hundred, five hundred, thousand, two thousand years ago, it might have been smart to run away to a mystery school and not tell anybody that you’re in the mystery school, and keep the teachings, and what you’re learning to yourself. But boy, one look at Facebook today, and you see the whole spectrum of human consciousness, human experience. I think it’s really cool. Everybody is sharing now. And so, I want to be a part of that. That’s why I decided, excuse my French, screw it, I’m just going to use my name.

Janine Bolon
Skip this noise. We’re just gonna make it happen. But I do remember sitting there with the page in front of me, and it was time for me to put what name am I going to use on that book cover? And I remember thinking, ooh, because you know, this is back in 2005 for me, and Facebook was not what it was. YouTube wasn’t even out yet. I still had a MySpace account. So, kind of let you know, and nowadays, I love what I see. And I love that mystics, like yourself are stepping forward. So, thank you for doing that so we can find you. It’s also helpful that your hero Michael Creighton, he kept his name. He didn’t go and hide, although would have been very understandable if he wanted to with what was going on.

John David Latta
You know one of the chapters in Michael Creighton’s book was about him spending two weeks out in the desert with a spiritual teacher by the name of Brugh Joy. And it was because of that story that Michael Creighton wrote, that I met Brugh. Well, Brugh was this very eminent physician in Southern California, and was a part of the Medical Scholastic Society, the top 1% of all medical students in the United States. He just had a brilliant intellect. But he went through a huge change in his mid 30s, and in less than a year, he sold his medical practice traveled all around the world for nine months and came back and was a spiritual teacher. And so he went through a lot of the same thing, it was just sort of like, wow, I’m starting to have these mystical experiences, should I stay being a doctor and kind of work undercover? Or should I just ditch the professional together? And so, I am inspired by a lot of these people sort of coming out of the closet.

Janine Bolon
Yeah. And that’s truly what it is. And like you said, on Facebook, and social media, more and more are coming out, and talking about their experiences, and its all walks of life. It’s just, I think, more pronounced for those of us who are in the academic, or scientific profession where it’s frowned upon. You don’t start mixing those two things together, it’s like oil and water, a lot of people believe, and what they don’t understand, like you said, life is more enriching when you have all of these facets working. So, talk to us a little bit about when it came to marketing your book, and that kind of thing, did you have a marketing background with your business that you could call upon for this book?

John David Latta
I did have a marketing background, and I do have a marketing mind, so, that has given me a leg up, I guess, when you step into the sort of self publishing world. But I had a consumer products company, and all we did was market brands, I never marketed myself, I always would hide behind my brands, we never marketed the company, we never marketed me as the CEO or the owner, we always marketed the brands. And so, this is new, marketing myself, marketing my book. That’s a whole new level of vulnerability, and exposure.

Janine Bolon
Isn’t it though?

John David Latta
It really is, and I was able to delegate a lot of the marketing. So, this is the first time, not only am I promoting myself, which is weird and new. But doing it myself, where I tended to come familiar with marketing, but I send it outsources to other companies, employees, PR firm things like that.

Janine Bolon
So, what’s most surprised you about self-publishing of your book? What was the surprise for you?

John David Latta
It’s time consuming. There’s a huge learning curve. Man, there are so many ways to spend your marketing time and your marketing dollar. It’s dizzying, I was again, just talking to my wife about this, this morning, like, you know, maybe up until 60 years ago, there was print, and radio, it was pretty simple. Then, TV came in, and now there’s a dizzying number of platforms. So, there’s search, and social media, and there’s podcasts, and blog posts, and email, and they’re seeking reviews from influencers, there’s book tours, there’s book signings, it’s dizzying, you could write a book, and spend the next 40 hours a week for the whole next year, marketing your book. So, the shocking thing is, I’m learning to compartmentalize my time, because I enjoy writing, and a part of me likes marketing, but I can get sucked into marketing full time, too. So, I’m trying to get a little bit of time for marketing, more time for writing. That’s been the big surprise.

Janine Bolon
Right? And do you find yourself doing a lot of time blocking? How do you set your time up for writing versus marketing your book?

John David Latta
I’m still trying to figure that out, Janine.

Janine Bolon
And that’s part of that vulnerability. When you figure out the golden rule, let me know, because I’m still seeking that one myself. And I’ve written, I’m on book number 12, as you know, you’re a part of that project. And it’s one of those things that I just had to do time blocking. And it’s like, this is an appointment with me, and there is nothing that’s going to change this unless you know, it has to be pretty serious before it’ll change what my calendar looks like. And my friends always giggle because they’re like, hey, Janine, when can we see you? And I’m sending them calendar links, because my life is like you said, when it comes to marketing your book, it is more than a 40 hour a week job, you can let it become all consuming. Yeah. So, talk to us a little bit about what you see as far as a change, if you started marketing your book today. How would you change things relative to what your first neophyte, noob, as some people might say, when you first came out with your book? How would you change the marketing on your systems then what you are using?

John David Latta
I think I would learn about all of the platforms, decide which ones would work for me, and the kind of book I’m promoting. And I would have been, a quote, unquote expert at it six months ago. And try to have them all synced together, because I’m learning on the fly right now, and the books already out. And it’s great, it’s fun, but I think if I had to do all over again, I would have picked two, or three, or four platforms, figured out a way to sync them, figured out the time blocking that you’re talking about. Because now I’m learning on the fly, and I’m realizing if I let it go, it could be 40 hours a week. So, I would have been an expert at it before the book came out, and had everything synced together.

Janine Bolon
Right. Yeah, that’s one of those things that it’s not until you’re almost knee deep into it, that you’re like, whoa, wait a minute, this can get out of hand. And by the time you figure that out, you’re up to your armpits, and the river is starting to rise. All of a sudden, you’re making decisions, so, I understand how that works.

John David Latta
That’s exactly right.

Janine Bolon
So, what has worked best for you when it comes to selling your book?

John David Latta
What works best for me so far, you know, marketing is a fun, funny thing, because you may remember, there’s an old saying that, I know advertising, I know advertising works. 50% of my advertising dollars wasted, I just wish I knew which 50%. And so,

Janine Bolon
It’s so true.

John David Latta
It is true. And so, you do a lot of things, and it’s hard to correlate. Like is this what’s successful, and this is not successful. But my best guess is just posting regular content on Facebook, snippets of chapters from the book sometimes, because I wrote a book full of short stories, sometimes I could post a whole chapter on Facebook, and then a link to where to purchase it, that type of thing. Posting reviews from other readers, that type of thing. I would say Facebook has probably been, that and email has probably been my most successful so far. But that’s just a guess.

Janine Bolon
Right? It’s like, let me go back and see what’s working. I have to correlate all this stuff. You know, that’s why so much of our lives are link, hyperlink heavy, because we’re constantly trying to figure out where traffic is coming from. So, we know where to spend that other 50% of our advertising dollars, right?

John David Latta
Or on our advertising time too.

Janine Bolon
Oh yes, it’s both investments, right? It’s time and it’s money. It is both. So, out of curiosity, what process did you try that was just an epic failure when it came to your book?

John David Latta
Well, LinkedIn has changed a lot, and I heard some people say, LinkedIn is a lot like Facebook now try LinkedIn. I think so far, LinkedIn has been an epic failure for promoting a book. Now, if I’d written a certain kind of book, and if I’d been the kind of person that had been on LinkedIn, that was networking, and communicating like crazy, I bet it would have been successful for me. But I don’t think I’ve found the mystic business person on Facebook yet, or excuse me on LinkedIn yet.

Janine Bolon
Right? Right. That makes sense. And it’s one of those fun things that I like to share with people. LinkedIn is where I go when I want to really talk to scholars and business owners, that sort of thing, service industry professionals. But if I’m trying to get people to click on a link, it’s almost always Facebook, that is where I go. But I meet my network on LinkedIn. So, that’s one of the things I like to share. So, if I can help any author with that, that’s why I’m sharing that part. So, what story do you like to tell about yourself that really gets the most laughs from your audience?

John David Latta
The book was launched on April 1, and I thought that was hysterical, is April Fool’s Day, and so much of the book, my version of the mystic path is stumbling into things over and over again, walking the path of the fool. Things would happen to me I didn’t know where possible. I learned words I didn’t know the meaning of, and I also tried to share stories in the book that are very real and human. There’s a story I did not share in the book about being a single parent, and I’ve got a nine year old and 11 year old, and I’m going to tuck them into bed one night, and we had a black cat named Smokey, and I went in my son’s bedroom and in the Seattle area it doesn’t get dark till 10:30pm in the summertime. I’m trying to tuck my son in around 8:30 or 9. And I see the cat all stretched out like in the sun on the pillow, and I go to tuck my son in, and the cat has died on the pillow. Like the cat died in full stretch. Like it was completely stretched out, and I’m saying, oh my God, and they don’t prepare you for these things in parenting school.

Janine Bolon
No, they do not.

John David Latta
That exact moment my son is walking into the bedroom, and he loved that cat, and so, I was like, oh my God, well, I got to figure this out on the fly. So,

Janine Bolon
Go dad go.

John David Latta
I know, and both the kids are looking at me like, oh my God, the cat died, what do we do now? And so, we had our very impromptu, we didn’t go to bed, we went outside, dug a hole in the ground, and had a little burial ceremony for our cat Smokey, and put little trinkets on top of the grave, and said sweet things about the cat, and the kids went to bed happy. So, a lot of my book is full of stories like that, where I just say, I’m walking the path of the fool, and it’s like, oh, my God, now what do I do? So, yeah.

Janine Bolon
Right. So, that’s one of the things that my community knows I’m a Heyoka, I was struck by lightning when I was 9, at 9 or 10. I always mess up the year, but oh, well, anyway, and so I like to say I’m kind of the court jester, you know, if I’m not falling over my own feet, making people laugh on the outside, I’m laughing on the inside over something that’s wholly inappropriate, right. So, do not invite me to a funeral, because I’ll laugh hysterically because something will get me giggling, and because I feel all the tension around the room of everybody being sad, I’ll start laughing. And so, that’s probably something you’ve probably done, I just wanted to share with you that if you’re walking the path of the fool, you act inappropriately, not on purpose, but just spontaneity, and it’s because you’re figuring things out on the fly. And so, anyway, it’s wonderful, wonderful story. Thank you. So, tell me, what’s the biggest change that you’ve seen in yourself, since you’ve started marketing your book?

John David Latta
I think the thing that we talked about earlier, that sense of overwhelm with marketing. At first, it’s fun. It’s like, oh, my goodness, I’m going to market… I mean, I guess there’s that vulnerability issue, and there’s little fear, but who doesn’t like seeing the reviews starting to show up on Amazon, and watching the book climb in the rankings, and then it climbs some more, it’s like kind of encouraging, and it’s kind of fun. So, I think I had to decide, did I want to be a book marketer? Or did I want to be a writer? And I’m trying to divide time between the two, so, the biggest change has been deciding that I wanted to be a writer more than a marketer.

Janine Bolon
Right? And that’s, that’s huge.

John David Latta
Yeah.

Janine Bolon
That’s huge. That lets you know, there’s many authors out there who wrote one book, and they are now book marketers, and that’s why. You’ve explained it perfectly for our listeners on why that is. And then there are people who are crazy, like you and I are, like, no, I gotta write the next book. Like, I can’t help it, sometimes I’m not even done with the one book and the next books, like crowded into my space. And it’s one of those things where you’re like, ugh, because you know what you’re gonna have to do.

John David Latta
I know the ugh.

Janine Bolon
You know what you have to do now right? Because now it’s like, oh, my gosh, now I have to do this launch. Right? And it’s not necessarily, you were saying, it’s not necessarily rinse and repeat, because things are changing as you’re writing the book, the platforms aren’t staying the same, right? So, no offense, but you get a little frustrated. Somedays I just have to go for a long walk. Okay, back to you, because you’ve got some epic stuff that you’re doing. So, talk to us about those top five tips that you would give authors about selling their books from what you’ve learned in your own life path?

John David Latta
Oh, yay, that’s a fun one.

Janine Bolon
Yes, it is.

John David Latta
So, the very first thing is, I would say, if you feel compelled to write, just write. And the two things I’m going to offer right at the gate are complete opposites of each other. One is, write from your heart, write from your soul, write from your gut. Don’t give a worry in the world about whether the book is going to sell, or how it’s gonna be received, or if it’s weird. But now that it’s done, find your audience. And so that is, now we got to put the marketing hat on. So first, I’m going to say, channel the book as clearly, and cleanly, and with as little resistance as possible. Two, would be find your audience. Three, find a way to market your book daily, or maybe twice weekly, but don’t let it overwhelm you. That would be the next thing. Don’t let marketing overwhelm you. Give yourself time to write. And then, somebody gave me some advice and said, there’s so many ways to market now, it would be, it might be simpler to pick one or two that fit you best, and be really good at that. Like maybe podcasting. Maybe you’re really verbal. Maybe you like to have a conversation. Maybe you’re familiar with the technology. But if you don’t like podcasts, and you don’t like putting your face, and your voice out there, pick a different one, but get really good at it. And I think that’s the other thing I’m figuring out is I’m trying to refine maybe two, or three things that I like best. Some people might want to do blogs and email newsletter type of things. So, I mean in summary. Write, write what’s, write what’s true for you, find your audience, and find a way to market that doesn’t overwhelm you. I think that would be my summary.

Janine Bolon
Right. And I love what you say about find the platforms, and the way that works for you. Because I’m going to be very honest with you, I haven’t shared this yet, but I have interviewed over 28 authors, and not a single one of you has given the same advice when it came to marketing their book. Yeah, I am not lying. As a scientist, I’m like, by the time I hit 10, to 11 authors, I’m gonna start hearing a pattern I’m gonna start. No, nothing could be further from the truth. I’m at author number 28, and I still haven’t heard the same thing twice. Now you guys will glance next to each other on certain things, or certain things that are commonalities. But as far as how-tos you guys are giving, so, this book is going to be great when we’re done. And thank you so much for being a part of that, because when I asked you guys for your top tips on how to market a book, just realize, I don’t think anybody has the golden key.

John David Latta
Yeah.

Janine Bolon
I don’t think anybody has the one recipe, and thank goodness, because guess what authors, we’re a diverse bunch.

John David Latta
I can’t wait to read your book to see all these different ideas actually that’s kind of exciting to me.

Janine Bolon
It is, it’s wonderful. So, but your tip on do what fits your personality, do what fits your comfort zone to start off with, right? Because you’re going to have to grow, and expand if you’re going to market your book, but start with what your comfort zone is, start with what you’re really good at, and then move from there, expand from there. So, next question for you is what’s the one thing that you most misunderstood about becoming an author?

John David Latta
This sounds like a simple one, but the editing takes a lot of time.

Janine Bolon
Yes it does.

John David Latta
And I have so much compassion for editors, like that’s a hard job. I wrote a book with 119 short stories, and while there is some chronology, and they all sort of linked together, I wrote them to try that each one standalone. The idea I was hoping, somebody could just open to the middle of the book, and read a story or two. And because I like reading books like that when I go to bed at night, and so I thought, and I’m not a terrible writer, I’m a new writer, but I’m not a bad writer, this book’s gonna be easy to edit. Oh, my gosh. And I,

Janine Bolon
Try again, thank you for playing.

John David Latta
Try imagine writing a 500 page fictional novel with full of characters, and setting, and try to imagine the amount of editing that might take place, and do you want to move chapter 42 over to 21. And so, I have so much compassion for editors. And all authors out there, beware, editing takes time. And it’s all good feedback. And so, you send your manuscript off, the editor edits it, it comes back to you, you wade through all the changes, some of them really easy, some of them are more challenging, you send it back again, that comes back again, and so, I completely underestimated the amount of time it takes to edit a book.

Janine Bolon
Right? Yep. If you’ve never done it before, so that is one of the biggest surprises. And then for you, what’s the primary thing that’s been your biggest reward, now that your book is out now, now that you’re an author?

John David Latta
Yeah, a sense of accomplishment, a sense of completion. You know, I had the same experience as you as I’m writing the book, I literally right now, Janine, I’m working on three, or four other books that are half done. And it’s frustrating to me, because I’m marketing the first book, which is fun, and I want to give it the attention it deserves, but at the same time, I’m excited about the other books. But in the process of writing the book, I learned more, and in the process, what it feels like to me, through the mystic path is one of nonstop integration. So, if there’s an almost infinite number of ingredients to the soup, another ingredient keeps getting added to my soup over and over again, and writing the book makes it real, it makes it liveable, it makes it integrated. And so, it’s a way of taking the equivalent of looking at your desk, and those piles and piles of notes, and condensing it all like, I’m gonna write this book. And the second thing, that I hadn’t really gleaned from it, the confidence I have going forward to write a second, third, or fourth book. That’s the biggest reward I think, to completing the first book.

Janine Bolon
I’d have to agree with you. It doesn’t necessarily get easier, I think you’re kind of alluding a little, it doesn’t get easier. But you have confidence now, in just how much you don’t know.

John David Latta
That’s my favorite saying, you don’t know, what you don’t know.

Janine Bolon
And then you become an author and you go, oh my gosh. But I encourage people to become authors, I encourage people to tell their stories, because we don’t, this comes to you as a scholar, as somebody who used to go to primary resources and primary documents. The thing with blogging and all the digital media, is the fact that we’re losing journals, like people aren’t journaling the way they used to. And so, by writing books, you’re helping add to history, you’re a primary, you’re primary viewer, whatever your story is, it’s going to be valuable to historians later on, just look at COVID. They were encouraging everybody to journal, journal your story, journal what happened to you, because the kids 20 years from now are going to be studying that point of history, and they will love to hear what was going on with Mary Smith or John Doe, or whoever, right? So, anyhow, well, Joel, I have thoroughly enjoyed our time together today, tell us how we can get in touch with you.

John David Latta
Website is John David Latta. L A T T A. www.johndavidlatta.com, and the book is The Synchronicity of Love Stories That Heal, Transform and Awaken.

Janine Bolon
And thank you so much for helping me. I don’t know why I called you, Joel, but your name is John. So, I love it when I do that, makes me laugh everytime.

John David Latta
Well you said your life is crazy, so I get it.

Janine Bolon
But I just wanted to say to folks, thanks so much for listening to the show. Definitely check out John and his book, and definitely, I’d sign up for his newsletter, because if you’re wanting to walk a path of transformation, whether you use Joseph Campbell as kind of that, the hero’s journey, or you are thinking of the Dalai Lama, or that sort of thing, all these teachers are sharing with us the same thing, whether it’s the power of now or the law of attraction, it’s that to transform yourself requires quite a bit of individualized work, and nothing is better than to read what other people are getting, right John?

John David Latta
That’s exactly right, and they transform me. I love first person stories from other people, and so that’s why I try to write my book in the same way.

Janine Bolon
Exactly, because it is, it gives you kind of like mile markers. It kind of lets you know, oh, I’m not insane. Or maybe that’s just my concern.

John David Latta
I hear ya.

Janine Bolon
Anyhow, if you are an author or you know of an author that you would like for us to spotlight, please visit our website, www.authorpodcasting.com, where you will find the 99 author project listed. We talk to all authors from all walks of life as we build our book number 12, which is advice from authors to authors that will be published in 2023. And this is Janine Bolon signing off with you today, and all of us here at The 8 Gates that produces the Janine Bolon show. We wish you a wonderful week and encourage you to get your message, your story, or your knowledge out into the world and make it a better place just like these authors are doing for the newer authors that are coming along behind them. We’ll see you again next week, and until then, keep sharing what you know with others, keep shining that light that is you, and don’t forget to go out today, and just do something for yourself that is fun. We’ll see you next week.

Bryan Hyde
Thank you for listening to the Janine Bolon show. Be sure to subscribe to our show notes by going to www.theJanineBolonshow.com, where you’ll find additional resources as well as the opportunity to sign up to receive our program in your email each week. Be sure to visit our sponsor at www.the8gates.com.

1 thought on “The 99 Authors Project – Season 4 – Episode 3 with John David Latta”

  1. I so enjoyed this and the honesty of marketing which is so rarely discussed and certainly in terms of mystic writers like ourselves. Great work and thanks for this.

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