The Janine Bolon Show with Mary Gaul - 99 Authors Project, Season 4, Episode 8

The 99 Authors Project – Season 4 – Episode 8 with Mary Gaul

Mary Gaul

Mary Gaul has over 25 years of experience in Communications, Administration, and Marketing for both international companies as well as locally owned businesses, Mary has developed skills that allow her to look at a situation or task and break it down into manageable steps. She has skills in all aspects of business administration including: Event Planning, Financial Management, Human Resources, Systems Management, Facilities, Operations, Marketing and Communications.  She uses this background to help Entrepreneurs tackle obstacles and expand what is possible.

Leaving the security of a regular paycheck in 2013, she started her own business and now shares the joys and challenges of being an Entrepreneur, running TWO successful businesses.  

As a working mother of two very active daughters, she has been a leader in many organizations as a volunteer or board member of mom’s groups, swim teams, and band parents associations. She currently serves on the Board of Directors for the Colorado Business Women’s Association. She loves giving back to her local community and helping to create the next generation of volunteers.

She is the author of two books: The Guests are Here! Helpful Hints for Easy Enjoyable Entertaining, as well as Vitamin C3 for Business: 52 Ideas to Connect, Contribute and Celebrate your way to success!” 

Mary always tries to bring a sense of fun to every interaction and loves to use her creative talents to spread a little joy to all those around.

Here are some Fun Facts: She is one of 8 kids, a huge Elvis fan, can sing all the words to Kanye West’s Gold-digger and loves to cook!

Visit Mary’s website here.

Transcript of the Show

Bryan Hyde
Welcome to the Janine Bolon show, where we share tips from around the globe. As we guide practical people with their finances using money tips, increase their incomes through side businesses, and maintain their sanity by staying in their creative zone.

Janine Bolon
Hello Janine Bolon here and welcome to today’s show. It is loaded with quality content on how to save your knowledge, work your business, and we got a few money tips on the side. Now just to remind you guys, the Janine Bolon Show is a syndicated program of four podcast shows that were combined in October of 2021. For my older listeners, I want to say thank you for listening to the Three Minute Money Tips, The Thriving Solopreneur, The Writers Hour Creative Conversations, and for those of you that were following me back in 2005, The Practical Mystic Show. Today we are highlighting Mary Gaul of the Success Magnified Fame. Not only will we be discussing a bit about how you can save your sanity as you work your business. But today, we will also be sharing with you how you can get your message, your story or your memoir out into the world. Now, you may already know that I’m interviewing 99 authors this year to get their guidance and perspective on saving your knowledge in the form of a published book, maybe a video series or don’t forget those audio playlists that you can record.

Janine Bolon
Now Mary Gaul, let me talk just a moment about her. She has 25 years of experience in Communications, Administration and Marketing for both international companies as well as locally owned businesses. Now she developed skills that allow her to take a situation or a task and break it down into manageable steps. And it was because of this that with Business Administration such as Event Planning, Financial Management, Human Resources, Systems Management, Marketing and Communications. She has the background to help entrepreneurs tackle obstacles and expand to what is possible. Now she was like me, she left the security of a regular paycheck in 2013. She started her own business and now she shares the joys and challenges of being not only an entrepreneur running two successful businesses, but also being a speaker and author, oh, and working mother of two very active daughters. And with that comes her being a leader in many organizations, such as being a board member of moms groups, swim teams, band parent associations. And don’t forget, she also is serving on the Board of Directors for the Colorado Business Women’s Association. So she loves giving back to her community and helping to create the next generation of volunteers.

Janine Bolon
She’s with us today because she’s the author of two books. The Guests Are Here! Helpful Hints for Easy Enjoyable Entertaining, as well as what we’re really be pointed toward today, which is Vitamin C3 for Business: 52 Ideas to Connect, Contribute and Celebrate Your Way to Success. So Mary always tries to bring a sense of fun to every interaction. She loves to use her creative talents to spread a little joy to all of those around her. And some fun facts you may not know she is one of eight kids. She is a huge Elvis fan. And bonus, she can sing all the words to Kanye West gold digger, and she loves to cook. So welcome to the show, Mary.

Mary Gaul
Thank you, Janine, it’s so fun to be here. And thank you for that wonderful background. I was like, oh, yeah, I did that. It was a good reminder to hear that.

Janine Bolon
Yeah, we sometimes forget everything that we’ve actually accomplished. And when we were talking a little bit earlier, one of the things I really wanted to bring out for people was just how multi-dimensional entrepreneurs have to be these days. It’s not appropriate to just do one thing and one thing well, like a technician like it used to be in the 50s. I know you’ve seen that yourself haven’t ya?

Mary Gaul
Yes, yes, we do have to learn a lot of things quickly to launch a business and then keep it going. You’re always learning, which is what I think entrepreneurs love about being entrepreneurs is there’s always a challenge to solve.

Janine Bolon
Right? And there’s always scholarship and training and yeah, you never learn at all. And that’s I think, you know, job security regardless, like you’re always be learning. So one of the things I like to ask authors is, when you first get ready to write your first book, I want you to go back in the wayback machine, especially for you because you’ve written multiple books. And I back in that moment, when you knew that you were going to have your heart on the page and you were getting ready to make that decision of do I use my real name? Or do I use a pen name? Talk to us a little bit about that discomfort of do I want to hide? Or do I really want to go out there? What was that like for you?


It was I never it never occurred to me to not use my own name. I guess that’s the ni.. what’s the word? I’m looking for?

Janine Bolon
Naivete. Not to worry honey, we all need help.

Janine Bolon
I was just very naive about the whole book writing process. And I was early into my entrepreneurial journey and the first book doesn’t really have anything to do with my business. It’s about kind of planning for parties, right? And I was an event planner in the past and but I just, it came about out of a conversation that I had with my husband and I was like, oh, you know, I have people always rave about the parties, I throw, I love to throw themed parties and all this stuff. And, and we had a supper club and I love to cook. And so I was like, what if I threw together like a little if I wrote a book about you know, how to throw a party. My husband kind of rolled his eyes and is like, yeah, right. Then the light bulb, the challenge was accepted, right? And I was like, I’m gonna write a book, darn it. Let’s figure it out. And so I just, I just started off from that point. And it never occurred to me to not use my own name, because these were tips that I was providing people from my own experience. Both books are the same way, they’re tips that I’ve learned along the way and, my life skills that I want to share with other people to help them. And so it just makes more sense to use my own name, I’d never really occurred to me to think of, of using somebody else’s name on the book.

Janine Bolon
And I find that a lot with nonfiction authors, we have a tendency to use our own name, but nonfiction or fictional authors, that’s where they really struggle, you know, do I want to do this or not? And yeah, it’s totally a different game for them.

Mary Gaul
Right. I do have a client who wrote a book, and it was more her personal memoir, and it was very traumatic experience. And she did use a pen name because she had even some legal issues with people, you know, non-disclosure, things that she couldn’t talk about. So, I understand that, you know, and it makes sense in some, in some instances, but for me, it just never occurred to me to to do it.

Janine Bolon
Right. So, once again, that’s an author’s choice. And there can be an that choice alone. First, you decide, okay, I’m gonna write the book. And then it’s like, oh, do I use my name or not? That can be another huge speed bump for some people, like some people get stuck there. And then comes the actual writing of the book itself. So just out of curiosity, would you say that you had a marketing background before you started writing your book?

Mary Gaul
Yes, I did, because my, my whole entire life is kind of been marketing, whether that was my job title or not. But that was my job title for many years in the corporate world, was Marketing and Communications. And so and Event Planning, like I said. I had that background, when I was writing the book that wasn’t, again, being naive, I just wanted to write the book to prove to my husband, I could write a book, and it was kind of a challenge. And then once I had the book, and once I started getting closer, you know, through the editing process, and I was like, oh, I’m gonna have to market this book. So what am I going to do about that? Right? How am I gonna get this out to the world? So, so then I started to put some of my marketing hat tactics on, you know, it’s like, okay, now, now the books written, it’s in the editing stage. Now, I’ve got to start really thinking about who do I want to get this book in front of?

Janine Bolon
So what surprised you the most and about book marketing and then publishing your book? I mean, what is the kind of the one thing that when you think about that whole process that you were like, whoa, I had no idea.

Mary Gaul
The printing piece of it, right? The first the first book I did, I did all by myself. So I did the layout, I did the you know, and I had skill set in that for my career, corporate career. I knew how to, you know, format the pages in a Word document and put the headers and footers and titles and chapter pages. And I could do all that myself. And I took the picture for the cover and the cover. You know, there’s some great tools out there for people that want to do everything themselves. I don’t recommend it, but again, being naive on the first one, I did it all myself. And then I knew I have the party planned, I wanted to get it at the party. So how do I get it printed, right? And so that was a big hurdle. I have a friend that I went to, and she’s in the publishing business so she was able to help me find the printer, a local printer that could get them done and delivered. But I didn’t allow as much time as I should. I was very rushed and very panicked at the end.

Mary Gaul
But the second book, we did, it was again, a quick turnaround. I did a lot of it myself, but I did hire experts to do the cover page and to do the the the formatting on the cover of the book and do the formatting on the inside. And it just looks night and day, so much better. It looks like a professional book, professional published books, even though they’re both still self-published. And then again, the printing always takes longer. Everything takes a little bit longer than you expect it to, right? The editing if you’re using an editor going back and forth, it takes a little bit longer and then okay, now it’s to the printer. You know, you can upload it to Amazon within an hour, right and it’s on Amazon, but to get an actual physical printed book takes a little bit longer if you’re going through Amazon or a local printer like I did, because my second book is a is a rare size. So it’s a square book, five and a half up by five and a half. And so which I love that size, but it’s made it a little more challenging to find a printer that can turn those around because they have to move all their printing equipment around. So, so the timing of things threw me, you know, again, being naive, it’s like, yeah, just get this done, right, I’m a get it done person, let’s just make this happen. And another person, other people’s schedules, and timelines kind of, you know, threw me for a loop and was a little frustrating for me. But both books ended up coming around and being done pretty quickly.

Janine Bolon
And that’s one of the things you know, being project managers like you and I are, you know, we’re used to having multiple, you know, balls in the air, plates spinning, whatever you want to call it. And that is, I have to agree with you. I was shocked when I really understood what the printing process was all about. So just to help the next author in line behind us, you know, to reach a handbag, what would you change if you started marketing your book today? I mean, what are some things that you’ve learned that you were like, Oh, I would so do it differently? What are those points?

Mary Gaul
Yeah, I would have started booking speaking engagements while I was writing the book. I would have maybe done some surveys of my target audience. You know, while I was writing the book, to make sure I had things that were included in the book, that were relevant to what they wanted to learn. And, you know, then making sure I was talking about it the whole time, I was writing the book, right, and just keep dropping little hints, I’m writing this book, I’m writing this book, it’s coming. And then here’s the party, right? I started marketing, like with the party and that was the launch of the book, I didn’t really do any pre-marketing while I was writing the book, or while I was in editing, and that kind of thing. So the book marketing started with the book launch party, which I love that as well. But, you know, there could have been a lot more pre-planning, pre-marketing going on to get people excited about it and get the buzz built ahead of the book launch party. And then, you know, keep going afterwards. It’s not just one thing, and then, you know, that’s kind of what I do with my first book, it was one party and then okay, how do I, then it was kind of done?

Janine Bolon
Because we don’t know, you know, it’s not like you learned from Hollywood if you look at how authors are touted in the movies or film industry, you and I both know, that doesn’t happen unless you’re on national media already. But for folks that I like to say, the 99% of the rest of us. You know, it just doesn’t work that way. So yeah, if you don’t mind share with us what worked best for you, when it came to selling of your books, what was something that worked the best?

Mary Gaul
Yes, speaking really worked the best. Being able to sell my book, from stage. For, my Vitamin C3 book, I created my own speaking event, basically. So I created a thing called pep talks and it was seven author’s, kind of TED Talk style, where we each had 20 to 30 minutes. And I knew I wanted to use that as my book launch. So I had that that event scheduled already to it, and I was going to be talking about my business. And then once I knew the book could be ready, you know, that’s again, the timing was I picked it up the day before the events on the printer, I had to drive to Longmont to go pick it up for lunch, so go pick it up. But, you know, I was able to have the book there in person, so people could buy the book. And then I had other speaking gigs already, you know, lined up where I could go and sell the book and talk about the book and then sell copies there. That was the most successful. You know, I did sell some copies online. And I still have some online sales happening in five years after the book, right? Because I repurpose the materials still. But the biggest things at the beginning, were really for me being in front of people where they could buy the book, and I could sign a copy and they could buy one, you know, for their friends or whatever, buy a couple of copies. And then I did have some because it’s a business Facebook, I did have some businesses or like sales teams buy, you know, buy in bulk, where they would buy 20 boats or 25 books. And then I did a couple of conferences where they bought a book for everybody and put it in their goodie bag. So those were bigger chunks of books that were sold, which was nice too, but they’re all kind of tied back to speaking and then making the sales from the stage.

Janine Bolon
And then this is my favorite question to ask authors. So tell me something that you tried and it was an epic failure. Now I know my stories on this. I always love hearing from other authors. So what did you try and it just did not pan out?

Mary Gaul
Yeah. You know, I tried doing a Facebook ad and doing it myself and I think I ran it for like the first month or so and didn’t get a single sale. You know, and just kept plugging money. It’s like, okay, you set your budget each week and that that budget went, that budget went, that budget went, that budget went. And I know it can be successful for people, if you do it correctly, I obviously didn’t do it correctly, which was like, okay, that was a waste of money, and time and effort, and I didn’t get a single sale from that. So then I was like, okay, I’m better off for my type of book, I’m, you know, maybe better off doing this in person, in my personality, or whatever it is, whatever it was. But that was kind of something I tried, spent some good chunk of change on and didn’t see a single book sale from it. So I was like, okay, that was not really worth my time. And hadn’t maybe had I hired an expert to do it would have had different results. But again, I could figure everything out on my own. Right?

Janine Bolon
Right. And when it comes to your first or second book, you’re trying to build a following. And so this is very helpful information there. You’re not the first author to say, yeah, wait on the Facebook ads, wait on all of that. So yeah, quality advice. Thank you so much. So what story do you like to tell about yourself, that gives you the most laughs with your target audience?

Mary Gaul
There’s two that come to mind. But but the Vitamin C3 book, it’s about business tips, right how to connect, contribute, and celebrate together? So one of the ones that always gets people in the audience going, whenever I talk about it is my celebration dance. And so I encourage people to find little ways to celebrate all the little things that our wins during our day, because they are there and we if we don’t acknowledge them, then you just focus on what didn’t get done and what you still have to do and what didn’t go right.

Mary Gaul
That’s our natural tendency. So we have to bring the celebration into your into your life. And so I do a little celebration dance where I have them, you know, if they’re sitting down, I might say, okay, lift up your left knee and your right arm above your head, and now lift up your right arm and right knee and your left arm. And now let’s do that over and over again. So they’re in their dance, their fist pumping, happy dance is what I call it, the fist pumping, happy dance. And I say I do this, when I get an Excel formula to work. I do that when I have a great client call. I do this throughout the day, I’m doing my fist pumping, happy dance, right? And then people start to laugh. And they’re always like, yeah, I need to do that. So I have people that saw me speak five years ago in the book come out, came out. And when they still see me, they’re like, oh, Mary, the fist pumping happy dance. Right? So people remember that and they talk about that. I don’t know if they do it in their office, but you know, I still do it when I have a great moment with a client conversation, when something goes really well, when I finally get a project done, you know, do a little fist pumping, happy dance, take three seconds to just make yourself feel better and acknowledge your win.

Janine Bolon
Yes, because you’re a leader, you know, it gets really lonely. It’s lonely at the top, you know, and you understand if you’re not celebrating yourself, it’s kind of hard to bring people into the loop, especially when you’ve been struggling with that Excel spreadsheet.

Mary Gaul
Yeah. Or when you make your first book sale, right? Or when you finally get the book in your hands? You know, it’s like, yeah, I did. It’s an actual thing. It’s not no longer just thoughts in my head. It’s an actual physical thing. It’s really fun to celebrate those moments.

Janine Bolon
It is, I totally agree. So what year did your very first book come out?
Mary Gaul
In 2014.
Janine Bolon
2014 was when you wrote the first one, because the world looks very different today. And that’s one of the things I’d like to encourage people is that self publishing in 2005 when I first started versus 2014, was a huge leap. However, now 2022, another huge leap. Right? So what is the biggest change that you’ve seen in yourself since you started marketing from your first book in 2014? I know we’ve gone through a lot. But I also know that there are core things that are different about you now than when you first started marketing.

Mary Gaul
Yeah, I mean, the first time I called myself an author, a published author, was incredible. And then, you know, both of my books have been Amazon bestsellers in their categories, right? So both books made it to the bestsellers. So I have that screenshot so, so the first time. The first time I put that in my, you know, in my bio, she’s an Amazon best selling author, I was like, oh my gosh, like it just elevated that the first one was really I couldn’t wait show my husband. Like, look, not only did I write a book, but I’m an Amazon best seller. Might be 13 categories deep in my overall category, but I’m an Amazon bestseller. I had the screenshot to prove it. And, you know, so it was vindication for that little self doubt that I had, you know, it’s like yes, I can be an author. I can put my words out there. And then, then the other thing is just really owning that I have something valuable to say, and that I have something that somebody can read and apply to their business or to their life, and it can improve their life, right? So everything you know my goal in life is to just make everything better than it was before in some small way, shape or form. And so knowing that I’m out there, and people are reading the book, and they’re taking those tips and making their lives better, that really has changed. It’s impacted how I see my role in the world, right? In a bigger sense, like, okay, I have knowledge, I want to share it with people, writing books is a way I can share that knowledge with people and make their lives better.

Janine Bolon
I agree when you take on that label, author, yeah, it’s a whole, it changes you. And it’s for the good, but it does change it when you really integrate that word into your vocabulary when you’re describing yourself. So now that you’re this author, you’ve been doing this for quite a while, a few 1,000 books or so that you’ve been able to sell, you know, that stuff now? What are like the top five tips that you could give authors about selling their books?

Mary Gaul
Yes. I love this question. So like I mentioned before, I’m very deadline driven and process project management oriented anyway. So plan the party first. Once you know you’re gonna write a book, I started both books with when’s the party, how am I going to celebrate this? So celebration, obviously, it’s in my book, too. So celebration is key. So plan the party, and then work yourself backwards from there. You know, how, how long before the party do I need to have the book in my hand? When do I need to book the party place? You know, when do I need to have it to the editor? I just worked backwards, because I’m all about the celebration. So for me, that was a great tip. Plan the party first, then work your way backwards to make sure you can hit all those deadlines. Again, accountability and deadlines work well for me, right? So if you’re in the writing process, start planning your party, and then you’ll know okay, I have to have this to the editor, I have to have the cover done by this time. All the you know, everything else that needs to happen with the book. So plan, the party first is the first tip.

Mary Gaul
Number two is, don’t get frustrated, it’s very easy to get frustrated. Again, we talked about the timelines. And if you’re working with other people, you’re kind of at their mercy of the editor, you know, you can push and push and push and be the squeaky wheel. If you have a deadline you want to do but again, share your here’s my party date, I can we make this happen, right? So you, you have a deadline, because otherwise it can, you can tweak and tweak and you know, go back and forth and get really frustrated on all these little details. If you don’t have an end date in mind. So don’t get frustrated, just keep, it’s part of the process, just you know, say what am I learning today, in this process? Remind yourself it’s all a learning process, if it’s your first book.

Mary Gaul
Number three is get help from professionals. Like I mentioned, my first book, I did all by myself very proud of that, but at the same time, when I got help from professionals, it just looks so much better. The book looks like an actual book. The first one looks like an actual book, too, but the second one just looks so much better, and so much more professional. And you feel better about you know, being out there and promoting your book too when it looks really well. Represents you well, as an author. So get help from professionals. There’s all kinds of people at all different levels that you can choose from but really get some help from from professionals for creating your book. And then also for marketing your book, there are some great tools and tips, and some people out there that can help you market your book.

Mary Gaul
Number four is, keep at it, keep just you know, it’s not just one event, like I kind of did with my first book, like, oh, I have my book launch party now we’re done with the book, right? On with life. And really to keep getting sales and keep building the audience building your following, you need to keep that book in front of people. So it’s not just I’ve had the book launch party now it’s done. But now how can I repurpose that? How can I keep it in my social media posts? How can I keep speaking about the book? How can I you know, keep this book out there and keep growing my audience? So it’s not just a one and done kind of thing. It’s a long term process. So my book, The vitamin C3 came out in 2017. So it’s five years ago already, which wow, that’s amazing. Five years ago, seems like just yesterday I was writing it. But five years ago, and I still use those posts three or four times a month, I’ll pull a post out of there, tip out of there, and put it in my social media. You know, that’s how I’m still selling books on Amazon five years after I wrote the book. Because I do keep repurposing that material.

Mary Gaul
And then that leads me into number five is repurpose, repurpose, repurpose. So you’ve written this great book, it’s full of great information, how can you pull bits of that out and make it relevant for today? Repurpose it, you know, put it in your social media write a blog about it that points back to your book. Interview somebody that has a similar kind of story that is related to yours, those kinds of things. And then how can you just keep it relevant and repurpose what you’ve already written? So those are my five tips for, for keeping at it.

Janine Bolon
And thank you so much for those. When it comes to planning the party first, what kind of lead time in your experience works best? I mean, let’s just make the assumption that somebody is going to have an editor, and then they’re going to self publish. So let’s make those qualifications. But, you know, do you give it 18 months, what do you recommend?

Mary Gaul
I mean, both of mine were really short. And the person who helped me publish my book, the second books, I’ve never tell anybody the timeline that we use, because I don’t want to do this, this is really too fast. And it’s not, you know, it worked for me. But she goes, we don’t want people to do it this fast. So I would say, you know, if you’re done, or you know, 80 to 90%, done with your manuscript with the bulk of your writing, and you’re starting to work with an editor, give yourself six months after that, right? So if you’re close to the editing part, because it’s going to take, depending on the editor, and the workload and the timeline back and forth. How many edits you need to do, and you might have some more writing to do, you know, a good six to nine months, from that stage to the launch stage. And you might launch a little sooner than that online, you know, you might do your online launch before you do your in person launch. Or you might do the in person launch, you know, working with whoever your professionals are, but I have to give yourself at least a good six to nine months, if you are working with a team to get everything done. You know, your cover design, all that kind of stuff takes time. The interior layout, once you have a manuscript done takes time. So planning that out, give yourself that amount of time, and then the printing, if you’re going to have hard copies at your at your launch. They can’t do that overnight, unfortunately. I want it tomorrow, right? So, so allowing yourself, you know, some time. And if you’re working with a publisher, a guide, you know, they can kind of give you that timeline as well, based on the size of your book, and the scope and all of that kind of stuff and say, okay, you know, we’re gonna need at least six months before this book’s in your hands. So you can work with them to work on the timeline, but I think six to nine months is a pretty good range.

Janine Bolon
And I have to concur that I have done it faster, I have cranked books out in three to four months. And again, my publisher was like begging me, please don’t tell people we’ve done this. Because I already had a lot of it edited, I know how to use my beta readers, I have a lot of systems already in place. And so you know, this was books, eight, nine and 10, you know that we were cranking out pretty quickly. However, I always say, I give myself nine months. And so I’m glad to hear that you’re like six months at the shortest and about nine months. And, and that’s when I already have most of the content worked up, you know. Now I know to start pulling in my professionals. So thank you so much, Mary, that kind of just gives a little confirmation on the craziness that is you and I’s lives when it comes to that. So last question for you. And I always like to hear what other people say. But what is the primary thing that you think is the biggest reward about being an author?

Mary Gaul
I would go back to the the impact, you know, statement I made before, is my books are tips driven, right? They’re how-to books kind of thing. So taking my story, my experience and passing that along, paying it forward, if you will. And both books are about connection. And so in their own ways, right? So The Guests are Here is about how to throw a dinner party and how to start a supper club. So how to build that connection with other people in your world and not be in the kitchen the whole time, but be able to enjoy your guests while they’re there. And so that was really fun for me to be able to take all of this stuff I’ve learned in you know, 40 years of throwing parties in my own home or, you know, for big corporations. How do we make those connections with the people that are in our lives, right? And it takes time and effort to make those connections happen.

Mary Gaul
In Vitamin C3, the same thing, same theme is there right? So I’m taking all of my knowledge, my skills on building relationships, in business and sharing your knowledge, the whole, all the tips on contribution are about how do we take the knowledge we’ve gained and share that with other people to make their lives easier, better, happier, whatever it is, right? And then how do we celebrate those moments? So I think getting my life experience out in paper where it lives and exists beyond me, is really a powerful thing to do. Right and knowing that whoever picks up one of these books, they can flip through to any page, they’re gonna get a sense of who I am as a person, but also learn one little thing about that can help them for the rest of their lives or help them make a big a deeper connection with, with a loved one or with their neighbors or with their, with their clients and their business associates. So that’s really what I love about being an author is that I have created this. I’ve built this knowledge, I’ve earned this knowledge through my lifetime. And now I have a method to share it with other people. And it lives beyond me, right, in a book.

Janine Bolon
Yes, it does. So hey, people listen to you. How do you want people to reach out to you? How do they connect with you?

Mary Gaul
Yeah, the best way to connect with me is just through my website Successmagnified.com. I play around on LinkedIn. But my website has a way for you to book a free call with me if you want to talk about anything. I’d love to chat about anything business or cooking or dinner parties too. So they can book a call with me. They can see, you know, how I help my clients there. I have events that are posted there. So if they’re in the Denver Metro area, or if I have virtual events, they can check those out on my website as well. So pretty much you can find out everything you need to know about me on my website. Successmagnified.com

Janine Bolon
Thank you so much for your time today being our spotlighted author, Mary, it was wonderful having you on the show.

Mary Gaul
Thank you Janine, thanks for the work you’re doing to help other people get their stories captured and get them out there.

Janine Bolon
My pleasure. And if you are an author or you know an author that you would like us to spotlight, please visit our website at authorpodcasting.com where you will find the 99 Author Project listed. We talk all authors from all walks of life as we build out book number 12, which is Advice from Authors to Authors, which will be published in 2023. And this is Janine Bolon signing off with you today and all of us here at the 8Gates that produces the Janine Bolon Show. We wish you a wonderful week and we encourage you to get your message, your story, or your knowledge out into the world and make it a better place just like these authors that we’re interviewing this year. We’ll see you again next week. And until then, keep sharing what you know with others, keep shining that light that is you and don’t forget to go out today and do something for yourself that is just plain fun. See you next week.

Bryan Hyde
Thank you for listening to the Janine Bolon show. Be sure to subscribe to our show notes by going to www.theJanineBolonshow.com, where you’ll find additional resources as well as the opportunity to sign up to receive our program in your email each week. Be sure to visit our sponsor at www.the8gates.com.

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